Infertility: An Essential Start Guide to Start From-How To Understand & Empathize With Infertility

 

 

SECOND DRAFT

 

How To Understand & Empathize With Infertility

A couple of weeks ago, my friend was diagnosed with infertility.

It wasn’t easy for her to hear the news. But what made it even harder was how unprepared she felt for it—as though the weight of infertility had just fallen on her shoulders without warning or preparation.

How could this happen? Why did this happen? What am I supposed to do now?

She didn’t have any answers, but what she did have was a lot of questions and feelings—a lot of anger at the universe and herself for not being able to give her husband the one thing he wanted most: a baby.

She wondered how many other people were facing a similar situation and didn’t know what their next step should be.

According to a study, 1 in 4 couples in developing countries is affected by infertility, and about 48.5 million couples experience infertility worldwide.

So today, we are going to share with you some tips that helped my friend navigate through her infertility diagnosis so that if it happens to you or any of your relatives, you will be able to empathize with it!

Before that, let’s have a look at what can cause infertility.

What Can Cause Infertility In Women

Here are some of the most common causes of infertility in women:

  • Ovulation Disorders

Ovulation disorders occur when you don’t release an egg from your ovaries every month as you should. Ovulation disorders may also lead to irregular periods or no periods at all.

  • Hypothyroidism

This condition occurs when the thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones needed for proper metabolism and growth of tissues in the body. In women with hypothyroidism, ovulation does not occur every month as it should, which may lead to infertility problems if untreated. A study demonstrated that hypothyroidism in women causes menstrual irregularities.

  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

PCOS  is a condition that causes hormonal imbalances in your body. The syndrome can also cause irregular periods and weight gain around the abdomen. According to a study, women with PCOS have a 15-fold higher prevalence of infertility compared with women without PCOS.

  • Fertility Problems Due To Other Medical Conditions

Some medical conditions may affect fertility in both men and women:

  • Diabetes: Women with diabetes have an increased risk of developing infertility. This is because women with diabetes have higher levels of insulin in their blood which can affect ovulation and egg development.
  • Thyroid Problems: Thyroid disease can affect your ovulation cycle and make it difficult to get pregnant. If you have a thyroid problem, talk with your doctor about how best to manage it to have the best chance at conception.
  • Cancer Treatment: Some cancer treatments can affect your ability to get pregnant, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cervical cancer or surgery for ovarian or endometrial cancer.

How Does Infertility Affect Mental Health

Infertility can affect mental health in two ways:

  • First, infertility can cause depression and anxiety because many people feel like they have failed at something they were supposed to be able to do—have a baby. This feeling of failure can cause stress and anxiety in itself.
  • Second, some people may turn to unhealthy coping mechanisms such as alcohol or drug use and other risky behaviors to deal with the stress of infertility. These behaviors may include taking drugs like cocaine or ecstasy (MDMA), smoking marijuana, drinking alcohol excessively, or even driving while intoxicated.

The good news is that there are ways to cope with the stress of infertility—and they work! 

How To Empathize With Those Experiencing Infertility?

Infertility is a growing epidemic, and it can be a very isolating experience. Here are some tips to help you understand and empathize with what your friends and family are going through:

  • Be Compassionate

If you’re close to someone who’s experiencing infertility, you want to make sure that they know you’re there for them and that you understand what they’re going through. Don’t be afraid to ask how they’re feeling or if there’s anything they need, but also don’t take over the situation or try to fix it for them. You can offer support without being overbearing.

  • Listen Without Judgment

This is so important! When someone is experiencing infertility, they often feel like no one understands what they’re going through. Try not to jump in with advice or suggestions right away, and let them talk about what they’re going through. You’ll show your friend or family member that they aren’t alone and that their feelings are valid by listening without judgment.

  • Don’t Ask Unnecessary Questions

Don’t ask questions like “Why don’t you just adopt?” or “Do you know why your body won’t let this happen?” These questions will likely make them feel even more frustrated with the situation—and possibly even guilty for not having made their decision yet. Instead of asking questions like this, try being there for your friend in another way (like offering to go shopping with them).

  • Be Supportive

Tell them that you support them in whatever decision they make about their treatment plan or whether or not they decide not to pursue treatment at all (which is also a valid option).

The Final Words

You don’t have to feel helpless when someone close to you is struggling with infertility.

We hope this article has helped you understand infertility and empathize with the many people who suffer from it.

Together we can create an inclusive community of support for anyone who wants to become a parent but is struggling to do so. 

 

FIRST DRAFT

A couple of weeks ago,my friend was diagnosed with infertility. It wasn’t easy for her to hear the news. But what made it even harder was how unprepared she felt for it—as though the weight of infertility had just fallen on her shoulders without warning or preparation. How could this happen? Why did this happen? What am I supposed to do now? She didn’t have any answers, but what she did have was a lot of questions and a lot of feelings—a lot of anger at the universe and at herself for not being able to give her husband the one thing he wanted most: a baby. She wondered how many other people were facing a similar situation and didn’t know what their next step should be. So today, I want to share with you some tips that helped her navigate through her infertility diagnosis, so that if it happens to you, you can be prepared for what’s coming next! But here’s the thing: there is no right way to go through infertility. All paths are valid and all emotions are valid. There’s no right way to process the experience, but there are ways that are more helpful than others. So how do you navigate this horrible experience? Here are some tips:

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